Monday , May 16 2022
Home / Foreign / Without Women And Aid, Afghan Economy Will Collapse, UN Warns

Without Women And Aid, Afghan Economy Will Collapse, UN Warns

When Maryam went shopping in Kabul this week after several weeks cooped up at home, the Afghan mother was shocked to discover food prices had doubled — or even tripled — at the market’s well-stocked vegetable stalls.

“It’s very expensive, it’s clearly visible,” the 52-year-old, who lost her job after the Taliban returned to power in August, told AFP.

On Wednesday, a United Nations report said Afghanistan and its population of roughly 40 million people have suffered an “unprecedented fiscal shock” since the Taliban takeover and the decision by the international community to withdraw billions in humanitarian aid.

The report predicts an economic contraction of around 20 percent of GDP “within a year, a decline that could reach 30 percent in following years”.

“It took more than five years of war for the Syrian economy to experience a comparable contraction. This has happened in five months in Afghanistan,” United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Asia Director Kanni Wignaraja told AFP.

Another UN source said that such a situation was “never seen before. Even… Yemen, Syria, Venezuela don’t come close.”

For decades now Afghanistan’s economy has been undermined by war and drought.

But it was propped up by international aid, which represented 40 percent of Afghanistan’s GDP and financed 80 percent of its budget.

That was frozen when US-led international forces left the country and the Taliban took control.

“The sudden dramatic withdrawal of international aid is an unprecedented fiscal shock,” Wignaraja said.

For Maryam, trying to buy food in the Kabul market, it spells potential disaster.

Her husband is ill, and cannot work. They have seven children. Under the previous government, she was a civil servant, supporting the family with her salary.

But the Taliban sent women home, only allowing certain female civil servants — mainly those in education and health — to return. They have been vague about whether women will be allowed to work in the future.

For now, Maryam no longer has an income.

“I have eight mouths to feed, eight people to clothe at home, everything is expensive, and for the moment it seems impossible for me to find another job,” she says, not counting herself.

Spread the love ...let others enjoy this story

Check Also

Don’t Vilify Tambuwal Over Sokoto Mob Killing – Group

Diversity Bridge Builders Collective (DBBC), a coalition of advocates for true inclusion, zero prejudice and …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.